I be weaving again!!

So, finally the craft room has its new windows and a new coat of paint AND has been rearranged (bit weird; everything seems backwards). About 10 seconds after the last decorative touch was hung, the loom was liberated from its bag and some yarn selected from yarn storage!

Decided to keep it simple (resisted my brain’s urge to do double weave right out of the blocks) and am enjoying a nice, plain weave in contrasting colours. Aaaaaah…

The only downside to all of this was discovering that my threading hook is missing. I mean it can’t have gone far, but I have no idea where little thing is.

Thankfully my yarn choice was incidentally conducive to hand threading!

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Last woven item for 2016 was… (yes LAST year!)

Technically I took this off the loom at the beginning of 2017, but most of the weaving happened in 2016 and as you can tell from the creases, it’s been languishing in a cupboard ever since. Why? Well, I was disappointed with it.

Unlike my first skinny shawl, the shaping on this one went haywire! Which was only my own fault for weaving when a bit tired (never a good idea). Still, it was nice to see the way the fringe (while unfinished still) worked and the overall weave was nice and even.

Blue and white cotton shawlette

The lesson for me from both shawls is that shaping on the loom works, but needs maximum attention and preferably you should complete the project without any long gaps so you keep your rhythm. All good to know!

Shaping on the loom

Due to my long history as a knitter, I’m always checking out what people are doing with their needles. One knitted item that’s been showing up a lot is the “shawlette” and I think they’re a great idea because you can use it as a shawl or as a scarf and – as a knitter – you can do all manner of patterns and stitches!

But I’m not knitting right now. I’m weaving. So could I make a shawlette on the loom? I figured I could.

Here is the unwashed, cotton “proof of concept” shawlette. It certainly proved the the concept worked!

A woven shawlette
I couldn’t resist messing with the colour of the points.

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What’s been on the loom…

You may have noticed I’ve talked about not-quite-as-expected projects recently, but I don’t want you to think that I’m having a bad run. It’s not all sad faces and mutant cloth! No, the number of slightly wrong outcomes is partly a reflection of my sheer productivity. I haz been a weaving. A lot.

Here is a selection of the (successful) produce…

A number of finished scarfsIt has been wonderful playing with new yarns and lots of different textures!

Disaster strikes down a scarf

I was in a bit of a weaving slump this past week. A scarf I’d had high hopes for turned into a bit of a disaster, and for the most unexpected reason too. See I had a warp of mixed yarns and was so focused on what I was doing with them that I somehow managed to take my eye off my selvedge tension. Result; one wobbly edge!

The yarn on that side of the scarf didn’t help things, but I can’t blame the warp tension, or the nature of the yarn. Nope. It was me. And I wouldn’t mind quite so much if I could make it a feature of the scarf… sadly not so.

On the positive side, this particular disaster did give me a chance to do some blocking. I haven’t really done any since I knitted with some unfortunate yarn a few years back, so it was good to re-familiarise myself. It significantly reduced the wobble! Just didn’t eliminate it.

Returning to the plain weave

Since I started in on the xmas presents at the end of last year, most of what I’ve woven have been fiddly things; 4 shaft patterns, double weave and loops.  Then tablet/card weaving came into the picture and, while not fiddly as such, it has certainly given the brain some exercise!

So, after reacquainting myself with my yarn stash, I decided it was time to do some good old plain weave.

You know, I’d actually forgotten how fast you can weave a scarf? Before I knew it I was at the hemstitching point! It was also very relaxing and my mind happily drifted as I wove.

Must make a note to myself to do a plain weave project in between double weave etc, so I can relax and enjoy the weaving. Not that double weave etc were too stressful, but you have to pay so much attention to what you’re doing. This was like knitting garter stitch (I’m sure you knitters know what I mean)!

The funny thing about this project was that it took me as long to finish as to weave. That was because I added some of that fringe-like, fluffy yarn that was all the rage a few years back for knitters and it took forever to free the fringe-like bits from the web. Still, it looks pretty much how I hoped it would. Now I just need to give it a bath.

And I’m going to predict that the next project will be plain weave too.

From 2.5 to 3

I’ve been in no hurry to put a second heddle on my loom, despite having bought the required kit, but after doing my two and a half shaft yarn-speriment, it seemed a good time to move to three. So, on went the double heddle kit and I chose to try my hand at twill.

Now the thing that I’ve been curious about with twill is it has a different drape to plain weave. In the spirit of research I decided to see how big a difference by doing my twill with the same yarns as my first scarf!

Now, I wasn’t scientific in my approach, so I ended up with more ends per inch than I’d used in the plain weave (and slightly fewer picks per inch), but the result was interesting. Hopefully this image captures that the plain weave is crisper/stiffer:

plain weave versus twill - a side by side comparisonThe twill is on the right and, despite being denser in e.p.i. terms, it is “softer”. The cotton and mohair yarns are the same in both.

Very interesting.

As for weaving with 3 shafts, well, it was easy. The treadling order became a rhythm quickly and I was surprised I didn’t have to concentrate more.

As you’ll know from my bloopers post, I did eventually stuff up the order, but I blame that on having stopped to do some leno (a manually twisted weave):section of leno in my twill scarf

That got me all out of rhythm. Still, it was also an interesting thing to try in a piece of twill.

At some point I’ll tackle a 4 shaft twill, but the next application of my two heddles is definitely double weave!