When ‘lazy weaver’ wars with ‘get it right weaver’…

Inside of me there are two distinct weavers… the lazy one… and the one who wants to do it right. Sometimes they get into a bit of a brawl about how a project should be handled and this weekend was one of those times!

You see, there’s this lovely yarn and it’s been begging to be a scarf for ages. Problem is that it runs through a range of purple-blue-green-orange tones which make it interesting to cross with another yarn. What had been intriguing me was, in fact, what would happen if I cross it with itself, but that could end up a busy mess, so what to do?

Well sample, of course.

Except lazy-weaver was saying (imagine this in a very annoying, whiny voice) “I don’t want to waste yarn on a sample! I just want to get weaving.” and that didn’t sit at all well with the other weaver.

They did, to their credit, almost compromise on crossing the coloured yarn with a purple that was guaranteed to work. Or even black if worst came to worst.  In the end though, get-it-right-weaver snuck in when lazy wasn’t looking and made sure we sampled with black, purple and the yarn crossing itself! Well done to the get-it-right-weaver, I say.

So now I know which yarn will be used and I’ve washed it, so I know how it’ll finish up. All while ignoring the quiet grumbling in the background of lazy-weaver.

A little weaving project to get back into the swing of things

I decided that, seeing as I haven’t woven anything too much in recent months, I should ease back into the weaving thing with a small project. But what to do?

Well, as it happens, I have a satchel which until a few months ago had a beautiful image on it. Then the image decided to fall apart, one flake of PVC at a time! So, I picked apart the sewing holding the image panel and measured it for a new woven panel…

This is the panel freshly washed and dried:

spot pattern woven panel

Trust me that the colours are a lot brighter than this photo indicates!

Now I just have to sew it into the existing seems of the bag (guaranteed that won’t be as simple as I just made it sound) and then I can flaunt my new wearable woven around town!

I should add that I was moderately proud of my edges considering it’s been a while… and I was very pleased that I remembered to make the right adjustment for draw-in.

A little Scottish souvenir

The funny thing about Harris Tweed, is that it’s a twill. One theory on why it’s called “tweed” is apparently that the word was a misinterpretation of “tweel” (i.e. twill). I think that’s a nice story!

This photo doesn’t do the colour of these little samplers justice, but I’m very excited about finding something I can turn them into.

Some Harris Tweed samples

Meeting a Hariss Tweed weaver

Finally on my trip to Scotland I did something weaving related!! On a day visit to Lewis – same island as Harris – I got to watch a weaver at work. Very cool…

Based in Carloway on the west coast Norman, like many Harris Tweed weavers, has a single peddle powered loom which typically takes 600 ends of feather weight yarn and he weaves his cloth at home. He sends the cloth to a mill for finishing and then it’s certified as Harris Tweed from Carloway which his wife makes onto scarfs for their small shop but he mostly sells it as bolts of cloth.

I’ll post a photo later of his loom.

No weavy stuff…

I’m currently visiting the home of tartan (!!!!) but so far it’s been a holiday light on weaving stuff. Did see some cool backstrap weaving bits at the National Museum of Scotland (they werent Scottish) but I haven’t bumped into any Scottish weavy stuff. Of course there are kilts and clan tartan identifiers, but other than many a thing made from Harris Tweed I’ve struck out! So far…